Top 10 OSHA Violations [infographic]

Top 10 OSHA Violations

Every year, the U.S. Occupational Health & Safety Administration (OSHA) releases its list of the top 10 workplace safety violations, which can help employers anticipate risks and take preventative measures.

This infographic can serve as a helpful reminder of the most common workplace hazards and support your efforts to improve workplace safety. Let’s take a closer look at the numbers from 2018 to see where companies have the most room to improve.

Top 10 OSHA Violations

About OSHA

Since the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was founded in 1971, the agency has held firm to its core mission and operated with a single goal in mind: “To assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.” These efforts have helped reduce the rate of worker injuries and illnesses dramatically, from 10.9 incidents per 100 workers in 1972 to 2.8 per 100 in 2017, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

While most employers are no doubt familiar with OSHA’s regulatory activities (worksite inspections, compliance enforcement, etc.), the agency is much more than a standard-setting organization. For example, one of OSHA’s most important responsibilities is to provide employers with up-to-date information on known workplace hazards. They also provide concise recommendations for keeping workers safe and healthy in the presence of potentially harmful chemicals, machinery and more. Some of OSHA’s other responsibilities include:

  • Conducting in-depth research on workplace hazards to develop innovative prevention strategies.
  • Maintaining a reporting and recordkeeping system to monitor injuries and illnesses in real time.
  • Creating detailed training programs to promote workplace safety and health awareness.
  • Developing and evaluating state-run occupational health and safety programs.
  • Providing hands-on technical and compliance support to help employers reduce on-the-job accidents.

Organizations that are looking to make meaningful changes to their health and safety practices can benefit from exploring OSHA’s extensive catalog of educational materials. These resources provide employers with a variety of actionable solutions that can help them keep pace with emerging hazards and ensure their workers are protected from known threats. Considering the vast majority of workplace accidents are preventable, it’s important to stay up to date with modern health and safety trends.

We have more resources to help you stay “in the know” about OSHA!

Read this post about OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements for 2019 and watch our Annual OSHA Update Webcast.